Deployable LTE networks: Telefónica shows search & rescue, industrial use


We were very proud earlier this year to participate in Telefónica’s Mobile World Congress demonstration of LTE Nano, one of the world’s smallest deployments of a 4G standalone network. So it was great to find out that Telefónica has now moved the project on substantially, with a field demonstration of the potential applications of deployable 4G networks for search and rescue and first responder communications; and a variety of industrial communications tasks. If your Spanish skills are good, you can read more about the LTE Nano demo here, or view a YouTube video, also in Spanish, here. If not, I’ll try to fill in a few details. The demonstrations, which took place in Buitrago de Lozoya near Madrid, were developed in collaboration with Accenture Digital, one of the first companies to collaborate with Telefónica in the development of innovative services that operate on deployable 4G networks. At the heart of the demos was a complete 4G LTE network, integrated within a backpack and weighing less than 3kg. Deployable 4G for search and rescue In a search and rescue scenario, the 4G network was used to provide voice and data communications coverage to a rescue team carrying smartphones and tablet. A drone carrying an HD camera flew over the search area, streaming video in real time via the LTE network: illustrating how the ability to quickly locate a missing person, even in the most inaccessible places. Industrial and communications infrastructure In a second demonstration, the same deployable 4G communications infrastructure was used to visually inspect Telefónica’s satellite communications monitoring antennas in the region. At 30m in diameter and located more...

Welcome to the Quortus blog


Welcome to the Quortus blog. Over the coming months we’ll be keeping you up to date not only with news about our own virtualized core network solutions, but also more generally about developments in network functions virtualization (NFV), mobile edge computing (MEC) and the cellular industry in general. These are exciting times for wireless communications. The move towards software-based solutions to implement core network functionality is creating a sea change that goes much further than simply replacing “big iron” communications equipment with off-the-shelf hardware and virtualization technology. It’s about deploying intelligence wherever in the network it’s needed. It’s enabling the creation of new service models and the realization of the integrated communications systems that have long been talked about. And it’s signaling the path towards hetnets and 5G. Quortus is playing a key role in this move. Our technology is designed to be scalable, so it really can be hosted anywhere: in the cloud, on customer premises equipment, or embedded in today’s compute-rich radio hardware. It’s carrier class, providing the robustness and reliability that the cellular industry expects. And it’s genuinely innovative, with features such as high mobility and standards-compliant VoLTE. The impact of this virtualization technology revolution is wide-reaching. It enables genuinely integrated enterprise communications systems; robust, field deployable tactical communications networks for the emergency services and military; morale and reachback communications for remote sites like oil rigs and mining facilities; connectivity for remote communities; and a host of other use case scenarios that would be impractical or uneconomic using traditional technology. I hope you’ll find our blog interesting. If you have thoughts or comments, we’d love to...